Newburgh Canoe
Designed and Drawn by Rob Hewitt
and Built By Brian and Jane Horne Using U K Epoxy Resins
I needed another boat building project and have always fancied building a Canadian type canoe. Right, I thought, need to start searching through the usual channels for one that has everything, yes I know "impossible." Anyway, after much searching I finally found something that came near to my acceptance!
Rob Hewitt of U K Epoxy Resins came up with the solution. He had just designed one such canoe. The Indian style Canadian has handsome lines, nice little baby, modern construction of plywood, stitch and glue, fibre glassed seams. I decided to go ahead. Rob supplied all the materials except the wood. That suited me fine; I had plenty of timber in stock already. I studied the plans and found them to be simple to follow.
 
Sorting the plywood sheets The first job was to cut the 3 sheets of 1/4 inch plywood in half longitudinally. Problem No 1, all the measurements are in metric; at my age you only work in feet and inches. Solution, measure in Millimetres, it took me slightly longer but we got there.
Next job was the two pieces of ply each 2 foot by 8 foot needed to be scarfed together end to end using epoxy resin. Cutting the scarfs is quite a simple operation and only requires a plane and a couple of clamps to achieve a good close fitting joint.

For further instructions on scarf cutting and bonding

Go to our products page where scarfing and stitch and tape is explained fully
Planing the scarf
clamping the epoxied scarf The image on the left shows Brian clamping the scarf joint together you can just see the polythene sheet between the clamping block and the joined plywood pieces. This joint is bonded by precoating each face with Resin/Hardener mix and then applying some more Resin/Hardener thickened with High Density Filleting blend to one face and then closing the joint. The plywood can be panel pinned in several place to stop the joint sliding during the clamping process.

For further instructions on scarf cutting and bonding

Go to our products page where scarfing and stitch and tape is explained fully
The image on the right shows the plank stock scarfed together clamped and weighted. Heavy weight used for clamping
Sanding the scarf The image on the left shows the finished scarfed joint being sanded smooth the plank stock is now ready for marking out.
The image on the right shows the the paper templates for the plank ends being cut out, the template are placed in position on the end of the plank and drawn around the template is then flipped over to make a mirror image for the other end of the plank. There is a full sized template for each each plank end, a centre thwart come carrying yoke and templates for a paddle blade the instructions for making the paddle are on the main drawing sheet. plank end templates
Cutting the planks Next task I measured up and marked out for the 8 panels, all clearly marked on the plans. I cleaned the edges with a smoothing plane and spoke shave down to the lines drawn because sometimes it is not too easy for me to be accurate with a jigsaw.


The two bottom panels were laid together, a few holes drilled along the bottom edge (as per instructions) in order to stitch them together. Now I needed to make the V blocks shown in the drawings . I opened up the two bottom panels, set them in the V blocks, hey presto the keel was laid. Cup of tea called for! Fitting the bottom panels
check with temporary midships bulkhead Jane checking the bottom panels against the temporary midships bulkhead
I then proceeded with the other panels, again as per instructions. After a bit of squeezing, tightening of ties, pressing here and there you end up with a little lady with a graceful figure and very pleasing lines first two runs of plank stitched in place
third plank run stitched in place Brian stitching away
The Hull is finally stitched Fully stitched hull
Filleting the seams The next day was warm and sunny so I tacked along the panel seams with smoothed dabs of fillet to hold her together. When all was cured I removed the amidships temporary bulkhead ready for full length seam filleting. That was a mistake which meant she sprung slightly. My advice is to leave the temporary bulkhead in till later and make the fillets longer, i.e. between the cable ties
My error was easily remedied by easing the seat for and aft bulkheads to effect a tight fit. Here on the E coast we sometimes suffer from easterly winds, cold too. That is what happened the next day; temp 8c. I pressed on with the filleting but covered the lady with a plastic sheet and set a fan heater inside to keep her bottom warm whilst she cured. That worked well the next task was cutting off the cable ties then taping the along the seams. No problems some of the ties at the ends where the planks came together I had to leave in. Outside I cut them off flush. The inside is glass taped over. Setting the huul shape
filleting and taping wtertight bulkheads in place The framing and tops for the decks and seats had to be fitted. Takes a bit of time to fit a good joint but it makes you feel better, don't you think.
The image on the right shows the seat side support frames being fitted the seats are also buoyancy and light storage compartments if screw yacht hatches are fitted. For the gunwales I didn't want to be bothered with steaming so I used some 30 mm teak from stock. To overcome the compound twist I profiled 1 metre of each end then epoxied and scarfed these together ends for end in situ using plenty of G cramps this worked fine. side frames being fitted
bouyanct tank/seat before lid is fitted This is the rear seat and when sealed will contain a volume of 42 litres. The bow and stern compartments each has a volume of 34 litres, whilst the bow seat has a a volume of 50 litres giving a total volume of 160 litres. These measurements are approximate but you can expect a buoyancy 160 kg or 25 stone.
Brian fitting the seat top bedded down with epoxy resin and hardener thickened with high density filleting mix. fitting seat top
fitting hatch Before varnishing I needed to cut out the holes in the seat bulkheads to fit some inspection hatches, the half turn plastic type were ideal, job done. I fashioned the yoke as per template supplied in the kit from a piece of teak, gluing and screwing this through the sides just under the rubbing strips. For good measure I added a backing piece for extra strength (guessing that the grand kids may sit on this whilst on expeditions!!)
Fitting the afterdeck again bedded down on epoxy resin and hardener thickened with filleting mix I used brass panel pins to hold the deck in place until the epoxy set. fitting after deck